Sundays with Sherlock – The Real Sherlock -Lucinda Hawksley

real SH
Published: 23 May 2019
Publisher: Audible Originals
Pages: N/A
Format Read: Audiobook
Duration: 2h 6min

Blurp:

Sherlock Holmes is the most portrayed fictional character of all time, and he has been reimagined by actors, playwrights and directors over centuries – but who is the creator behind the detective?
Conan Doyle’s own life was often stranger than fiction, and his most famous characters’ stories and personalities bear more than a passing resemblance to his own life and his closest friends.

Biographer and broadcaster Lucinda Hawksley gains unprecedented access to a treasure trove of Doyle’s never-before-seen personal letters and diaries. This is a chance for Sherlock fans to see their detective hero and his creator as they’ve never seen them before. Through interviews with Doyle aficionados, academics, actors and family members, we explore Doyle’s travels and sailing adventures across the globe, his pioneering work as a doctor, his life in the Freemasons and his fights against miscarriages of justice. As well as his many triumphs, we will also explore the challenges he faced, from the death of his first wife and son to the initial rejection he faced as an author.

We will also look beyond Sherlock to Doyle’s other great works including his fantasy and science fiction novels and hear how one of his most famous, The Lost World, part-inspired Michael Crichton’s book of the same name, which became the successful Jurassic Park film franchise.

Thoughts:

salty
Oh boy, you guys ready for this?

Before I start my rant that I do not really want to spend too much time on as this “read” was under the 3 hour mark I do not feel that it is fair that I should spend more than that on writing up an actual review. Getting this far has taken me longer than what this apparently amazing “book” is in length so you guys are just going to have to tough it out. Can you do that kids? Did you read that whole blurp in it’s entirety? It is a matter of life and death that you take that whole thing to heart as that basically sums up the book in more words than the actual book contained while at the same time blatantly lying to your face and setting up humongous expectations that are just shot down in flames of bad execution ideas. 

Here are some things I knew already before I picked up this book:
Sir A.C Doyle was a certified medical doctor. He not only Started a practice that was some what of a small success and later pursued a writing career that garnered him a lot more fame than what his initial practices would ever have done. He served as a doctor in the South African Boer war even after he got turned down because his country thought that he was too old, yet volunteered thus costing the British army not a penny and saving quite a few lives. Doyle also served as a medic on a whaling vessel that nearly claimed his life even before he started his writing career. Watson has parts written that are closely representative of his creator and Holmes was based or modeled around a tutor that Doyle had the fortune of practicing under. Doyle wrote The Lost World that would later inspire the Crichton books that shared the same name. Some famous people Doyle knew were Harry Houdini, Winston Churchill, J. M Barry (creator of Peter Pan), Oscar Wilde and my mum (bless your heart Mrs. McSalty)

Here’s what I did not know before I picked up this book:






That blank represents exactly what I did not know before I got into The Real Sherlock. Take the things I said I knew and imagine someone used that to make a 2h and 6 minutes audio docu where the 6 minutes was used to introduce the 1 actor and not the 100 that the blurb states, with the exact same introduction throughout the whole ordeal. I am actually surprised I can’t remember his name now.  This docu was interesting in a small way, is the only compliment I will be giving this book. That and the fact that it had A.C’s actual voice in an interview, apparently that never aired, in which he supposedly gave us insight into his thoughts regarding his ideas and writings. The part where the blurp says that this author got some super insights into more turns out to be:
A: A pen he used
B: An inkwell
C: Some dairies that A.C kept his notes in as well as some letters he sent to his mother which was sweet to read.
D: A.C ‘s night gown that he wore almost on a daily basis not long before he passed away of a heart attack.
E: One of his daughters that had the maximum of three minutes at the most to try give us an idea of the man her father was. I would have been way more invested if the author could’ve actually sat down and just talk to this lucky woman that had such a genius for a father. I would have liked it even more if it was a different biographer that did it altogether actually, remind me not to let my biography ever be written by the woman that half assed her privilege to acquire such a “treasure trove”.

If you are going to describe these items to me in audio form instead of giving me an actual documentary I can watch, do not bother. Words like” oh wow, a Pen” and “oooh a night gown, is this what A.C wore and how tall was he?” simply just do not work for me. Also if you are going to bring in relatives and they are talking, do not fucking cut them off mid sentence, also do not switch from “oooh a Pen!” then give me an excerpt from the Audible read by Stephen Fry, with no actual context to it, that just pisses me of into the next level. Giving me a very brevitive summary on an author I have come to love and respect and doing him dirty like this just does not sit well with me. It is quite a dickish thing to do in fact and I hope some one has told the creator of this in so many words to her face. Maybe I am a bit harsh, but if you claim to be a true fan of some one, one would expect things to be done with a lot more love than this conglomeration of snipets and titbits that was thrown together like something you’d come to expect of a cheap ass orphanage pie. Man the more I write the more pissed of I get.  

Before I really loose my shit, I am just going to go out on a limb and say I gave this a 2 out of 5. I feel violated, I feel like my feelings have been played upon. Is it me or has 2020 really fucked even me up? Salty McDave is made of sterner stuff, when has a book ever driven some one to think up ways to do harm to some one? Forget I even asked that. I’ll consolidate myself on the fact that this was at least free on Audible. If you do end up dishing up actual hard earned money to some one that did such a half ass job as this one, you can expect me on your doorstep with a size 14 granite shovel at the ready to smack your sorry ass. Is it me or have I gone a bit overboard with the word ass? Fuck this 2020 bullshit. Fokof WP editor! Shitty Corona. I never want to come across a bad Sherlock book ever again. It’s taken me exactly 3h and 6 minutes to get here… 

McSalty out.



16 thoughts on “Sundays with Sherlock – The Real Sherlock -Lucinda Hawksley

  1. ♪Go Salty, Go Salty! ♪Who’s your momma, Go Salty!♪

    Man, what a disappointment. And interrupting the person you’re interviewing seems in really bad taste, beyond just destroying the interview. Sorry you had such a bad Sherlock time.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Yeah, seeing as Dave had raving reviews for all things Sherlock, I thought I should give it a go too, I thought why not begin at the start, you know, get to know the man behind the legend. Sadly others screwed that up for me. Oh well. I’ll take Dave’s word for it that the originals were great, he sadly could not read then to me as corona hit the world pretty badly. Oh well. Ill try getting to those in my own time. Thanks for the comment bro.

      As for my momma, seems A.C Doyle fixed up more than just wounds on his worldly tours if you know what I mean😉

      Liked by 2 people

  2. I listened to this one also, and while I got a little more out of it than you did (because I didn’t know much at all about Sir Arthur before this) I am also very glad it was free for me to listen to. It didn’t seem to deliver what it promised.

    Liked by 1 person

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